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18春《阅读(IV)》作业4-0001

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发表于 2018-5-21 15:09:40 | 显示全部楼层 |阅读模式
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18春《阅读(IV)》作业4-0001
1.Anyone meeting Matthew Daniels for the first time could easily assume that he is the product of a conventional, even privileged childhood. With his well-spoken manner, his Ivy League education, and his business card reading "resident, Massachusetts Family Institute," Mr. Daniels is the picture of youthful American success.
But Daniels can tell a story that refutes those assumptions about his childhood. His father abandoned the family when he was 2. His mother took a job as a secretary. But on her way home one evening she was mugged, sustaining injuries that eventually left her unable to work, the family went on welfare.
Growing up in New York's Spanish Harliem, Daniels was one of only four white students until ninth grade. Despite a difficult environment, he stayed out of trouble. He even won a full scholarship to Dartmouth College, graduating in 1985.
How did he do it? He credits his mother's religious faith. "It's why I didn't end up like the guys in my neighborhood," he says. "Some went to prison." Although his father, a writer, didn't support the family, he maintained contact with his son, emphasizing the importance of books and education.
Because of his experience, Daniels has become a passionate advocate of the two-parent family. He sees it as an institution under cultural siege, generally supported by "the person in the street" but too often dismissed by those in academic and media circles.
Some of the groups, he says, have miscalculated the social consequences of "trying to convince people that there are all sorts of" alternative family forms. Even during law school, he encountered professors who were "openly hostile to the idea that we need two-parent families to have a healthy society."
Reporters and academics may not be the only ones ambivalent about marriage. A new study of college textbooks finds that many texts on marriage paint a pessimistic view. They emphasize divorce and domestic violence, the report says, and focus far more on adult relationships and problems than on children's needs.
Question:According to the passage, Daniels is a __________ man.
A.successful
B.conventional
C.privileged
D.unfortunate
正确答案:
2.You will never guess whom I ____ on the street yesterday.
A.ran over
B.ran out of
C.ran into
D.ran upto
正确答案:
3.Also serving to produce a distinctive usage was the practice of distinguishing a son from a father by the use of Junior. This typically American practice began in the middle of the eighteenth century when most gentlemen had some knowledge of Latin and were familiar with the use of the term Junior, translated often into English as "the younger," as applied to such Latin worthies as Cato and Pliny. The practice was so well established by 1776 that three signers of the Declaration added the Jr. Agai. British custom has been different; the second of a pair of great statesmen is known as William Pitt, the younger.
Still another important movement beginning around 1750 was the rise of the name Charles. Earlier, Charles is hardly found at all in New England, and is rare in the other colonies. After that its growth was not only steady but even spectacular. By 1850 it had become one of the commonest names, and it has remained close to the top since that time. Its curious nickname, Chuck, is typically American.
Almost at an equal pace with the rise of Charles, the use of Biblical names, even in New England, began to fall off. Ebenezer, and even Samuel and Benjamin, came to have about them an old-fashioned aura.
The facts are clear enough; the causes remain obscure. Immigration probably had little to do with such changes. English influence, at the ideal level, may have helped the growth of Charles. During these same decades the name was increasing in popularity there, where Sir Charles Grandison was a much read novel and Bonie Prince Charlie had given the name a renewed vogue among those who still held sentimentally to the Stuarts. But most of the other new developments seem to be wholly native and even to run counter to British practice.
Question:The use of name of Charles ________.
A.was popular before the middle of the eighteenth century
B.began to be noticeable in New England in the early eighteenth century
C.was spectacularly popular by the middle of the nineteenth century
D.is less popular now than before
正确答案:
4.If it ____ tomorrow, I would not go out.
A.should rain
B.would rain
C.will rain
D.is going to rain
正确答案:
5.No one can avoid ____ by advertisements.
A.influenced
B.influencing
C.to influence
D.being influenced
正确答案:
6.When there are small children around, it is necessary to put bottles of pills out of ____.
A.hand
B.hold
C.place
D.reach
正确答案:
7.Only guests of the hotel enjoy the  ____ of using the private beach.
A.privilege
B.possibility
C.favor
D.advantage
正确答案:
8.Do you think there would be less conflict in the world if all people ____ the same language?
A.spoke
B.speak
C.had spoken
D.will speak
正确答案:
9.Anyone meeting Matthew Daniels for the first time could easily assume that he is the product of a conventional, even privileged childhood. With his well-spoken manner, his Ivy League education, and his business card reading "resident, Massachusetts Family Institute," Mr. Daniels is the picture of youthful American success.
But Daniels can tell a story that refutes those assumptions about his childhood. His father abandoned the family when he was 2. His mother took a job as a secretary. But on her way home one evening she was mugged, sustaining injuries that eventually left her unable to work, the family went on welfare.
Growing up in New York's Spanish Harliem, Daniels was one of only four white students until ninth grade. Despite a difficult environment, he stayed out of trouble. He even won a full scholarship to Dartmouth College, graduating in 1985.
How did he do it? He credits his mother's religious faith. "It's why I didn't end up like the guys in my neighborhood," he says. "Some went to prison." Although his father, a writer, didn't support the family, he maintained contact with his son, emphasizing the importance of books and education.
Because of his experience, Daniels has become a passionate advocate of the two-parent family. He sees it as an institution under cultural siege, generally supported by "the person in the street" but too often dismissed by those in academic and media circles.
Some of the groups, he says, have miscalculated the social consequences of "trying to convince people that there are all sorts of" alternative family forms. Even during law school, he encountered professors who were "openly hostile to the idea that we need two-parent families to have a healthy society."
Reporters and academics may not be the only ones ambivalent about marriage. A new study of college textbooks finds that many texts on marriage paint a pessimistic view. They emphasize divorce and domestic violence, the report says, and focus far more on adult relationships and problems than on children's needs.
Questionaniels attended a school where the majority of the students were _________.
A.boys
B.girls
C.whites
D.blacks
正确答案:
10.There are of course, the happy few who find a savor in their daily job: the Indiana stonemason, who looks upon his work and sees that it is good; the Chicago piano tuner, who seeks and finds the sound that delights; the bookbinder, who saves a piece of history; the Brooklyn fireman, who saves a piece of life ... But don't these satisfactions, like Jude's hunger for knowledge, tell us more about the person than about his task? Perhaps. Nonetheless, there is a common attribute here: a meaning to their work well over and beyond the reward of the paycheck.
For the many, there is a hardly concealed discontent. The blue-collar blues is no more bitterly sung than the white-collar moan. "I'm a machine," says the spot-welder. "I'm caged," says the bank teller, and echoes the hotel clerk. "I'm a mule," says the steelworker. "A monkey can do what I do," says the receptionist. "I'm less than a farm implement," says the migrant worker. "I'm an object," says the high-fashion model. Blue collar and white call upon the identical phrase: "I'm a robot." "There is nothing to talk about," the young accountant despairingly enunciates. It was some time ago that John Henry sang, "A man ain't nothin' but a man." The hard, unromantic fact is: he died with his hammer in his hand, while the machine pumped on. Nonetheless, he found immortality. He is remembered.
As the automated pace of our daily jobs wipes out name and face—and, in many instances, feeling—there is a sacrilegious question being asked these days. To earn one's bread by the sweat of one's brow has always been the lot of mankind. At least, ever since Eden's slothful couple was served with an eviction notice, the scriptural precept was never doubted, not out loud. No matter how demeaning the task, no matter how it dulls the senses and breaks the spirit, one must work. Or else.
Lately there has been a questioning of its "work ethic" especially by the young. Strangely enough, it has touched off profound grievances in others, hitherto devout, silent, and anonymous. Unexpected precincts are being heard from in a show of discontent. Communiques from the assembly line are frequent and alarming; absenteeism. On the evening bus, the tense, pinched faces of young file clerks and elderly secretaries tell us more than we care to know. On the expressways, middle management men pose without grace behind their wheels as they flee city and job.
Question:The final paragraph discusses _________.
A.people's discontent with their work
B.unexpected precincts
C.absenteeism
D.escape from city
正确答案:
11.To create a supercell, take a storm where wind speed increases with height, while wind direction veers; a situation in which updraughts and downdraughts within the thunderstorm can support each other's existence rather than cancel each other out. It is as winds blow into this turbulent region from three to five kilometers up that a low-pressure section of the storm may begin to rotate.
The rotation of this part of the storm (known as a mesocyclone) causes the air pressure to fall some more, prompting wind lower down to flow into the storm and speed up upwards. This creates a spinning updraught which high-level winds in the storm can boost in the same way that wind blowing across the top of a chimney does wonders for drawing up an open fire.
You're not yet looking at a tornado, though if you're watching this particular storm develop you might start looking for a getaway car —especially if the storm begins to change shape. When mid-to upper-level winds upwind of the storm encounter the supercell, some are forced to detour round it. They converge again downwind, moulding the storm clouds into an ominous anvil-shape in the process. But while some wind goes round the mesocyclone, some runs full square into this meteorological brick wall and is forced downward, creating a "rear flank downdraught" (RFD) which many experts believe is what makes or breaks a tornadic storm.
It's when an RFD tries to swing around the base of the storm, narrowing the area of wind flowing into the updraught and increasing its spin (in the same way figure skaters when their arms are pulled in) that you might want to get into your getaway car. If you're anywhere beneath whirling piece of meteorological give and take—a funnel cloud—you are in a bad, dangerous place known to stormchasers as "the bear cage". It's where, if the funnel cloud sticks around long enough for the updraught to touchdown on terra firma, you will find yourself on the inside of a tornado.
Question:What can be inferred from the third paragraph?
A.If an updraught is created, tornado appears.
B.A tornado comes into being when a RFD is created.
C.RFD is created if winds go round the mesocyclone.
D.When meeting supercell, winds will blow in all directions.
正确答案:
12.It was not until she has arrived home ____ remembered her appointment with the doctor.
A.when she
B.that she
C.and she
D.she
正确答案:
13.Yhudi Menuhin, who died in Berlin on March 12, 1999, at the age of 82, was a child prodigy who fulfilled his promise to become one of the world's foremost violinists before extending his range to teaching and conducting.
The gently spoken U.S.-born virtuoso became as renowned for his devotion to humane causes as for his mastery of the violin.
The spotlight has been on him since his debut at seven in 1924. By the time he was 13, he had performed in Paris, London and New York. In Berlin, his performance prompted physicist Albert Einstein to exclaim, "Now I know there is a God in Heaven."
Reportedly the world's highest paid musician in the 1930s, his striving for perfection made him a legend. Menuhin said the violin made its own demands, "Almost like a pagan goddess, exacting a certain tribute."
When he was 38, one New York newspaper wrote, "The freshness and unique purity of his playing is exhilarating. No other violinist has such speaking eloquence in the tone alone."
He gave up public violin performances in his 70s. His hearing was a little impaired by then and he had taken on many more interests. But his conducting was still full of energy and his travel schedule grueling.
"I feel that what I've learned in music I can apply to a wide repertoire, which is fun because I am exploring new terrain," he said in an interview at the time of his 80th birthday.
"But I feel no desire now to spend hours working away again at something which I myself in the past and other people can play far better than I can now. I don't see the point."
A British citizen since 1985 and a life peer since 1993—Baron Menuhin of Stoke d'Abernon in the County of Surrey—he had a school in England and an academy in Switzerland for young musicians, whom he often conducts.
He has also helped found various musical festivals, held the Nehru Peace Prize and was a goodwill ambassador for UNESCO.
While pursuing interests such as the environment, organic farming, alternative medicine, education and the plight of gypsies, he sticks to a long-standing healthy diet and yoga.
"I don't squander my energies. Keep myself in fairly good trim. I stand on my head every morning. Conducting is a wonderful exercise because it uses every faculty," he says.
Question:Menuhin began his career as _________.
A.a child prodigy
B.a violinist
C.a teacher
D.a conductor
正确答案:
14.In an Indianapolis neighborhood where some teenage girls flaunt pregnancies like new hairdos, Aisha Fields is unabashedly square: She plans to abstain from sex until she marries.
"Most of my friends already have babies," says Aisha, a high school junior and abstinence mentor. "Being pregnant is a fashion. Girls go around bragging:‘I'm three months (pregnant).' They think it's cool."
With 1 million US teens becoming pregnant every year, and 13 percent of all American babies born to teens, Aisha's "just-say-no" attitude is a policymaker's dream come true.
Federal and state officials are banking on such an attitude as they launch a new campaign to shrink the ranks of unwed teenage moms. On Oct. 1, the government will begin dispensing some of the nearly $850 million earmarked under the welfare—reform law over five years for teaching abstinence and preventing out-of-wedlock births.
But experts say there is no research to suggest that abstinence—only education will succeed. In contrast, more comprehensive programs that cover contraception, family planning, and communication skills can help delay sexual involvement by teens, according to a study by the National Campaign to Prevent Pregnancy in Washington.
"It seems foolish to be tossing away all this money without knowing whether it will work," says Lisa Kaeser, a senior associate at the Alan Guttmacher Institute, a Washington-based nonprofit group that researches reproductive health.
But experts agree the latest campaign against teen pregnancy marks a big improvement over older policies in one fundamental respect: It emphasizes prevention.
Question:The passage discusses ____________.
A.teen pregnancy
B.latest efforts to prevent teen pregnancy
C.differences in opinions towards teen pregnancy
D.money needed to help teenagers
正确答案:
15.There are no seats ____ for those who are late for the show.
A.available
B.enough
C.supplied
D.make
正确答案:
16.To make up an objective test, the teacher writes a series of questions, ____has only one correct answer.
A.some of which
B.each of which
C.which
D.that
正确答案:
17.Yhudi Menuhin, who died in Berlin on March 12, 1999, at the age of 82, was a child prodigy who fulfilled his promise to become one of the world's foremost violinists before extending his range to teaching and conducting.
The gently spoken U.S.-born virtuoso became as renowned for his devotion to humane causes as for his mastery of the violin.
The spotlight has been on him since his debut at seven in 1924. By the time he was 13, he had performed in Paris, London and New York. In Berlin, his performance prompted physicist Albert Einstein to exclaim, "Now I know there is a God in Heaven."
Reportedly the world's highest paid musician in the 1930s, his striving for perfection made him a legend. Menuhin said the violin made its own demands, "Almost like a pagan goddess, exacting a certain tribute."
When he was 38, one New York newspaper wrote, "The freshness and unique purity of his playing is exhilarating. No other violinist has such speaking eloquence in the tone alone."
He gave up public violin performances in his 70s. His hearing was a little impaired by then and he had taken on many more interests. But his conducting was still full of energy and his travel schedule grueling.
"I feel that what I've learned in music I can apply to a wide repertoire, which is fun because I am exploring new terrain," he said in an interview at the time of his 80th birthday.
"But I feel no desire now to spend hours working away again at something which I myself in the past and other people can play far better than I can now. I don't see the point."
A British citizen since 1985 and a life peer since 1993—Baron Menuhin of Stoke d'Abernon in the County of Surrey—he had a school in England and an academy in Switzerland for young musicians, whom he often conducts.
He has also helped found various musical festivals, held the Nehru Peace Prize and was a goodwill ambassador for UNESCO.
While pursuing interests such as the environment, organic farming, alternative medicine, education and the plight of gypsies, he sticks to a long-standing healthy diet and yoga.
"I don't squander my energies. Keep myself in fairly good trim. I stand on my head every morning. Conducting is a wonderful exercise because it uses every faculty," he says.
Question:The above passage discusses ___________.
A.how Menuhin worked hard to succeed
B.the legend of Menuhin
C.Menuhin as a musician
D.Menuhin as a successful violinist and a statesman
正确答案:
18.Don't risk ____ the chance which so many people dream of.
A.losing
B.to lose
C.lost
D.your life to lose
正确答案:
19.California-born and Stanford-educated, John Steinbeck gained prominence during the Great Depression of the 1930s as a novelist who combined themes of social protest with a benign view of human nature and a biological interpretation of human experience, a combination that gained him wide popularity and provided the basis for a career not only in fiction but also in journalism, the theater, and films.
John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr., was born in 1902, in the Salinas Valley, whose scenery, agricultural workers, and ne'er-do-well paisanos appear frequently in his fiction. His father was treasurer of Monterey County, and his mother was a former schoolteacher. Their library introduced him early to such standard authors as Milton, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, George Eliot, and Thomas Hardy. He was a contributor to the school newspaper, a varsity athlete, and president of his graduating class in high school, and he attended Stanford University sporadically between 1920 and 1925, majoring in English, but never finished the degree. He worked on ranches and on a road gang before trying futilely to establish himself as a writer during a brief stay in New York City in 1926, and he worked in a California fish hatchery and camped in the Sierras before publishing his first novel, Cup of Gold, in 1929. In those years he read D. H. Lawrence, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, and particularly the novelists James Branch Cabelland, Hemingway with enthusiasm, but his perennial interests were the classics of Continental literature and the ancient historians.
In 1930 he married and moved to Pacific Grove, California, where his father provided a house and small allowance to support him. Two unsuccessful novels treating the enchantment of the American Dream and the cost of pursuing it (The Pastures of Heaven, 1932, and To a God Unknown, 1933) preceded his first successes, Tortilla Flat in 1935 and In Dubious Battle in 1936. The first was an episodic, warmly humorous treatment of a band of paisanos (a mixture of Spanish, Indian, and Caucasian strands). Their picturesque and shiftless ways, naive affection for their church, mystical appreciation of nature, and loyalty to their band are given the air of legend and likened to the tales of King Arthur's Round Table. The second deals with a strike among fruit pickers, its defeat by the landowners with their vigilantes, and the efforts of communist organizers first to organize the strike and then to exploit the workers.
Question:In Dubious Battle gives a description of ________.
A.a group of paisanos loyal to their band
B.King Arthur's Round Table
C.the defeat of a strike by the landowners
D.soldiers fighting for freedom
正确答案:
20.If you ____ that late movie last night, you wouldn't be so sleepy.
A.hadn't watched
B.haven't watched
C.wouldn't have watched
D.didn't watch
正确答案:
21.____ in a peasant family, Jack always likes farm work.
A.Brought in
B.Brought up
C.Brought about
D.Brought out
正确答案:
22.Americans are pound of their variety and individuality, yet they love and respect few things more than a uniform, whether it is the uniform of an elevator operator or the uniform of a five-star general. Why are uniforms so popular in the United States?
Among the arguments for uniforms, one of the first is that in the eyes of most people they look more professional than civilian(百姓的)clothes. People have become conditioned to expect superior quality from a man who wears a uniform. the television repairman who wears uniform tends to inspire more trust than one who appears in civilian clothes. Faith in the skill of a garage mechanic is increased by a uniform. What easier way is there for a nurse, a policeman, a barber, or a waiter to lose professional identity(身份)than to step out of uniform?
Uniforms also have many practical benefits. They save on other clothes. They save on laundry bills. They are tax-deductible(可减税的). They are often more comfortable and more durable than civilian clothes.
Primary among the arguments against uniforms is their lack of variety and the consequent loss of individuality experienced by people who must wear them. Though there are many types of uniforms, the wearer of any particular type is generally stuck with it, without change, until retirement. When people look alike, they tend to think, speak, and act similarly, on the job at least.
Uniforms also give rise to some practical problems. Though they are long-lasting, often their initial expense is greater than the cost of civilian clothes. Some uniforms are also expensive to maintain, requiring professional dry cleaning rather than the home laundering possible with many types of civilian clothes.
Question:The best title for this  passage would be ____.
A.Uniforms and Society
B.The Importance of Wearing a Uniform
C.Practical Benefits of Wearing a Uniform
D.Advantages and Disadvantages of Uniforms
正确答案:
23.I'd rather that you ____ tomorrow than today.
A.came
B.will come
C.had come
D.is coming
正确答案:
24.There used to be a church behind the cemetery,____?
A.didn’t there
B.used there
C.usedn’t it
D.didn’t it
正确答案:
25.California-born and Stanford-educated, John Steinbeck gained prominence during the Great Depression of the 1930s as a novelist who combined themes of social protest with a benign view of human nature and a biological interpretation of human experience, a combination that gained him wide popularity and provided the basis for a career not only in fiction but also in journalism, the theater, and films.
John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr., was born in 1902, in the Salinas Valley, whose scenery, agricultural workers, and ne'er-do-well paisanos appear frequently in his fiction. His father was treasurer of Monterey County, and his mother was a former schoolteacher. Their library introduced him early to such standard authors as Milton, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, George Eliot, and Thomas Hardy. He was a contributor to the school newspaper, a varsity athlete, and president of his graduating class in high school, and he attended Stanford University sporadically between 1920 and 1925, majoring in English, but never finished the degree. He worked on ranches and on a road gang before trying futilely to establish himself as a writer during a brief stay in New York City in 1926, and he worked in a California fish hatchery and camped in the Sierras before publishing his first novel, Cup of Gold, in 1929. In those years he read D. H. Lawrence, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, and particularly the novelists James Branch Cabelland, Hemingway with enthusiasm, but his perennial interests were the classics of Continental literature and the ancient historians.
In 1930 he married and moved to Pacific Grove, California, where his father provided a house and small allowance to support him. Two unsuccessful novels treating the enchantment of the American Dream and the cost of pursuing it (The Pastures of Heaven, 1932, and To a God Unknown, 1933) preceded his first successes, Tortilla Flat in 1935 and In Dubious Battle in 1936. The first was an episodic, warmly humorous treatment of a band of paisanos (a mixture of Spanish, Indian, and Caucasian strands). Their picturesque and shiftless ways, naive affection for their church, mystical appreciation of nature, and loyalty to their band are given the air of legend and likened to the tales of King Arthur's Round Table. The second deals with a strike among fruit pickers, its defeat by the landowners with their vigilantes, and the efforts of communist organizers first to organize the strike and then to exploit the workers.
Question:Steinbeck's first success as a writer was ________.
A.Cup of Gold
B.The Pastures of Heaven
C.To a God Unknown
D.Tortilla Flat
正确答案:

答案:18春《阅读(IV)》作业4-0001.txt

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